News | Law

News

Primary tabs

#Class of 2018: Jayani Perera

Now an outspoken 27 year old, Jayani Perera’s descriptions of herself as a studious, socially awkward child are difficult to believe.

AI in law: how lawyers and scientists can avoid automated injustice

Poorly managed artificial intelligence has the potential to undermine the application of law, Research Professor Mireille Hildebrandt, a global leader in AI and ethics, will warn during a lecture at UNSW Sydney on December 13.

#Class of 2018: Kelly Wu

With dreams of Aria charts long gone, Kelly Wu threw herself enthusiastically into life at Law School and UNSW.

UNSW Law professor elected to the Academy of Social Sciences

Scientia Professor Rosemary Rayfuse has been elected to the Academy of Social Sciences in recognition of her exemplary achievements.

#Class of 2018: Elise Delpiano

From a small town in rural NSW to Washington D.C, Elise Delpiano talks about combining her law degree with a case of the travel bug

OPINION Citizenship-stripping plan risks statelessness, indefinite detention and constitutional challenge

Australia is proposing some of the toughest citizenship stripping laws in the world as it steps up efforts to curb extremist attacks - but the proposed law could run into significant legal hurdles.

OPINION Barley is tactical weapon as China takes on Australia over dumping

China's so-called anti-dumping action against Australia is really an action against Australia's overuse of anti-dumping provisions. Barley producers are caught in the crossfire.

OPINION The carbon tax that would leave households better off

It is possible to both tax carbon emissions and enrich households. A report to be released by UNSW Sydney today outlines how.

#Class of 2018: Agape Lioulios

After the passing of her mother, Agape Lioulios realised that her true passion lay not with international relations, but with the areas of mental health, justice and the law.

OPINION In defence of ASIC: there's more to regulation than prosecution

ASIC is under pressure to take every significant case to court. But that would delay justice and break its budget.

Pages