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George Brandis' submission to High Court in MP citizenship case is 'a stretch'

OPINION: Professor George Williams AO, the Sydney Morning Herald, 9 October 2017.

The High Court will begin hearing the cases of seven federal parliamentarians who are citizens of other nations on Tuesday. If it was only a matter of applying the letter of the law, their fates would be clear. This is because section 44 of the Constitution states that a person cannot sit in Parliament if they are a "subject or a citizen … of a foreign power".

Parliamentary prayers should be consigned to history

OPINION: Professor George Williams AO, the Sydney Morning Herald, 25 September 2017.

Whenever Parliament sits, the House of Representatives begins with two prayers. For the first, Speaker Tony Smith says: "Almighty God, we humbly beseech thee to vouchsafe thy blessing upon this Parliament. Direct and prosper our deliberations to the advancement of thy glory, and the true welfare of the people of Australia."

The Lionel Murphy papers shed more light on a controversial life

OPINION: Professor Andrew Lynch, The Conversation, 14 September 2017.

Today sees the release of thousands of pages from the parliamentary archives concerning allegations of improper conduct made against High Court judge Lionel Murphy. They shed alarming new light on an affair that gripped the political and legal class in Australia in the mid-1980s.

Indonesia challenges Australia’s anti-dumping measures at the WTO

OPINION: Dr Weihuan Zhou, The Conversation, 15 September 2017.

In the midst of sensitive trade negotiations between Australia and Indonesia, a dispute has broken out between the two countries over Australia imposing protectionist trade tariffs on Indonesian paper imports. But now other WTO countries are looking to emulate Australia’s “anti-dumping” policies in order to gain an economic edge.

Insight – Australia WTO paper dispute: impact on new EU antidumping methodology

OPINION: Dr Weihuan Zhou and Stéphanie Noël, Borderlex, 7 September 2017.

On 1 September 2017, Indonesia brought a dispute to the World Trade Organization over Australia’s anti-dumping measures on A4 copy paper. The implications of a ruling in this case will go far beyond the case at hand and may impact, in the long-term, the anti-dumping practice of the European Union.

The twisted politics of terrorism in Myanmar

Opinion: Melissa Crouch, the Interpreter, 12 September 2017.

ADB Program To Improve Commercial Law Skills

On 29 August 2017, UNSW Law hosted the graduation ceremony in Yangon for 36 lawyers who completed the UNSW/ADB Professional Legal Education in Commercial and Corporate Law Training Program.

The training program was designed and run by a team at UNSW Law led by Dr Melissa Crouch. The intensive training course ran from April to July 2017 and included training on contract law, company law, joint ventures, mergers & acquisitions, and environmental law.

The program is designed to support the emerging commercial legal profession in Myanmar. The graduation featured on MiTV (Myanmar television); 

'Legally dubious': Why you shouldn't bet on the postal vote going ahead

OPINION: Professor George Williams AO, the Sydney Morning Herald, 4 September 2017.

Australians are primed to vote on whether to recognise same-sex marriage. Survey forms will be sent to 16 million people from next week, and campaigning has begun in earnest. Despite this, the High Court may bring the postal survey to an immediate halt. This would be a first, with no other national poll stopped in its tracks in this way. But then again, no past government has sought to hold a national vote in such legally dubious circumstances.

Professor George Williams addresses National Press Club

Constitutional law expert George Williams has given a frank assessment of the government's High Court prospects on dual citizenship and the same-sex marriage postal vote.

Watch the full address here.

Below is a transcript of Professor Williams' National Press Club address:

The Constitution is not normally front-page news in Australia. Despite the profound impact it has on our politics and society, it is easy to see why.

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