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'Wording on race will ensure a 'no' vote, says academic'

Professor George Williams talks to the Sydney Morning Herald (21 January 2011) about how the panel's proposals were "sensible and well contructed". Please see the summary below:

A professor of law at the University of NSW, George Williams, said the panel's proposals were ''sensible and well constructed''.

He dismissed concerns about the proposed racial discrimination clause. ''If this is a one-clause bill of rights, then we've already got it within federal legislation in the form of a range of anti-discrimination statutes,'' he said.

'Smith considering bail chages to cut remand numbers'

Associate Professor Alex Steel speaks to the Sydney Morning Herald (23 January 2011) about how NSW has the largest number of criminals in remand in Australia. Please see summary below:

The state government is expected to relax tough bail laws in NSW, which has the largest number of prisoners on remand in the country.

Guess Who's Giving?

Biggest Single donation to the Ngoc Tram Nguyen Scholarship

Although the Law Alumni garden party held at the Mint in November 2011 was dampened by poor weather, about 140 alumni made it to the annual gathering. Amongst the attendees was Jeremy Kinross (BCom LLB 83) who surprised the Dean, Professor David Dixon, with a $10,000 donation to the UNSW Law 40th Anniversary Ngoc Tram Nguyen Scholarship. Jeremy’s donation was the biggest single contribution to this scholarship fund.

The Glanz Family - UNSW Law Family

Congratulations to the Glanz family! David Glanz, son of Steven Glanz (BCom LLB 78) and Joanne Glanz (BA 78 LLB 80), graduated with a BCom LLB in December 2011 with Honours Class 1 in Law. David is the fourth member of his family to have studied law at UNSW. Sister Jordana is also an alumnus, having graduated with combined Science and Law degrees in 2009 (with Honours).

"Tenants' group push for renters to have a greater say on building management"

Senior Lecturer Cathy Sherry talks to the Sydney Morning Herald about why renters should have more say in building management (19 January 2012). Please see summary below:

Tenants should be allowed to attend owners' corporation meetings to give renters a much greater say in how their strata buildings are managed and maintained, tenants' groups and strata experts have said.

"A referendum that can, and should, be won"

Professor George Williams writes that most Australians support the constitutional recognition of Aboriginal people in the Sydney Morning Herald (17 January 2012). Please see summary below:

Separating people according to their race is based upon a discredited 19th century scientific theory in which a person's race can determine everything from their intelligence to suitability for certain roles. Unfortunately, this thinking remains embedded in Australia's constitutional DNA.

"All politics isn't necessarily local"

Professor Andrew Lynch writes about how local government is unlikely to make it in to the constitution anytime soon (Inside Story, 10 January 2012).

"After all the horse-trading, Gillard team braces for judgement day"

Professor George Williams writes in the Sydney Morning Herald (20 December 2011) that the Gillard government has achieved remarkable success this year in steering contentious legislation through a hung parliament. See summary below:

"Appeals spark concern over use of scientific evidence"

Professor Gary Edmond talks to the Sydney Morning Herald (17 December 2011) about the problems with Australian courts handling medical and scientific evidence. Please see summary below:

A series of high-profile appeals has heightened fears the courts have become home to "junk science" - expert evidence that contaminates juries and leads to
innocent people being jailed.

"Tainted evidence - Science in the dock"

Professor Gary Edmond talks to the Sydney Morning Herald (17 December 2011) about the reliability of forensic evidence. Please see the summary below:

Gary Edmond, a University of NSW law academic who has researched expert evidence over the past four years, wrote in a paper in the Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences earlier this year: "A good deal of the opinion evidence produced by forensic science and medicine appears to be unreliable or of unknown reliability, and obtained in conditions that make few, if any, sustained attempts to minimise known risks and dangers."

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